Flower Prep Guide

STEP ONE

TAKE IT OFF

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Your flowers most often arrive tightly bound in wire and wrapped in cellophane. Take ALL of our super-duper wrapping and bands off of the botanicals.  You are going to want where the wire binding was to be situated in your vase about 1 inch below the top off the vase. Remove all foliage that will fall below water line. Prepare a container/vase of lukewarm water treated with floral preservative (packet provided, or 1 t. sugar, 1 t. bleach, 2 t. lemon juice to 1 qt. water).

STEP TWO

SNIP, SLICE, SNIP

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Next up, your flora needs a fresh cut! You want to cut at least ½” off the stems at a 45 degree angle with a clean sharp knife or floral clippers. We recommend a 45 degree angle to increase the surface area and allow your flora to drink more water as well as ensure they do not sit flush with the bottom of the vase/vessel for maximum water consumption and vase life. Immediately after cutting stems, place in treated water. It is best to slice and stick directly in to water to maximize consumption.

STEP THREE

BLOOM BABY BLOOM

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Just like us, your flowers are thirsty. Allow them time to drink and hydrate before arranging them. We recommend at least 2-4 hours. Make sure they are out of direct contact with heating/cooling vent.

STEP FOUR

ARRANGE, CREATE, STYLE, EXPLORE

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After your flowers have hydrated and stems are rigid, it’s time to do your thing. Feel free to leave the blooms as we have styled them, or try out a design of your own.  Pro Tip-save out your favorite bloom and place in a votive cup or small vase next to your vanity or bedside table for an added touch of joy.

 

STEP FIVE

FILL’ER UP

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Now the most challenging part…change water DAILY. Clean water prevents bacteria from growing (which causes a bad smell and your flowers to die…yikes!). Be a flower hero, flush out all the old water and add new. At a minimum, top off vase or container with fresh water daily. Some varieties of blooms, like hydrangea, can drink up to 1/4th cup of water each day. The life of each variety of flower is different and, as you can see, we like lots of variety in our bouquets. To keep your flowers fresh as long as possible, take out the flowers as they die so they don’t spread bacteria to the flowers that are still lovin’ life.

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